Scottish Society of Louisville

CELEBRATING THE SCOTTISH-AMERICAN HERITAGE

OF KENTUCKY AND INDIANA

PREVIOUS MEETINGS 2012

NOVEMBER 27

The annual meeting with a dinner and aucton to benefit the Heritage Fund, raising more than $1100!. Also, the presentation of the Alex Rose Award to past-president, James Hughes, and a donation of more than 100 jars of peanut butter to the Portland Avenue Community Trust.

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SEPTEMBER 25

Anne Marie deZeeuw and Larry Fredriksen share a talk about their adventures walking the West Highland Way, a 95-mile long-distance path stretching from the Glasgow suburb of Milngavie north to Fort William.

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AUGUST 28

Louie Cecil, lformer model, former fashion editor and current costume business owner, taked about her career and shared stories about her costume rental business, dating back to the 1970s.

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JUNE 26

Best sellling author, Liz Curtis Higgs will speak about “My Heart is in the Lowlands”. Liz is the author of 28 books, with more than 3 million copies in print.

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APRIL 25

New officers Arch Cunningham - Programs and Education, John Dickson - Hospitality, Janice Beatty - Member at Large, Marla Jo Cameron - Vice President, Jenny Dickson - Regional Celtic and Marleen Bailie - Electronic Services, were piped in to the meeting by Marleen Bailie and installed by Society President, Sanford Berenberg.

Society member, Richard “Dick” Moffett, spoke about “The Border Reivers: The History & Mystery of Scotland’s border clans.”

The dull thundering of hooves in the distance would send fear into the hearts of families gathered around the fire. The firelight would reflect the fear in the eyes of women and children as the galloping horses came closer. The men would stand guard at the bolted door hoping that the riders would go on past, seeing nothing in the humble surroundings worth taking. A collective sigh of relief would be breathed into the room as the sounds faded into the distance.

Such a scene could happen almost every night in the Border lands and it didn’t matter if the riders were English or Scottish, it was all the same. It was a way of life, albeit a harsh reality that one could be robbed, even killed by Border Reivers. Strangers walked with a wary foot in the land. They traveled only in daylight and never at night.

What was the cause of such circumstances? How did it come about that the land between England and Scotland could spawn, and continue to allow, such cruel activity? - courtesy http://www.nwlink.com/~scotlass/border.htm

Dick Moffet shared some insight into the ways of the border clans.

 

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FEBRUARY 28

Bill Hockensmith shared a talk about 18th century military history.

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EVENTS
Kirking of the Tartan Service
November 5
Louisville, KY
 
Kirking of the Tartan Service
November 12
New Albany, IN
 
THINGS SCOTTISH
Highland Games a day's drive from Louisville

 

Society Awards

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